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Author Topic: Selecting Multiple Objects  (Read 11079 times)

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Offline Aussie Carolyn

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Selecting Multiple Objects
« on: March 17, 2011, 05:00:03 PM »
I use three different methods to select multiple objects. Once the objects are selected they can be edited as normal, for example grouped, combined, resized, rotated or deleted.

Method 1. Hold down Shift key and use the mouse to click on each object to be selected.

Method 2. Select by colour.
- CTRL F for a new menu panel.
-drag colour selection from lower colour bar and drop into Style in the new menu panel as shown below.
- click on Find.
- All items of the selected colour are now highlighted.
Also you may notice the colour changes to a number in the style box.

ctrl f.JPG
*ctrl f.JPG
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Method 3. Hold down the Alt key on your keyboard and drag mouse through items to be selected.
When Alt is held down a red line will be visible, making it easier to select the chosen path.

selecting objects2.JPG
*selecting objects2.JPG
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« Last Edit: August 29, 2015, 08:37:28 AM by brynn »

Offline Radio

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Re: Selecting Multiple Objects
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2014, 04:12:30 AM »
Aussie Carolyn,
 i could swim over there and hug ya!  I've been searching for this simple answer for nearly 12 hours online and have even been in tears.  Every darn tutorial, whether written or video, assumed the questioner already had this very critical bit of knowledge for some inexplicable reason. Thank you, thank you, thank you!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline Aussie Carolyn

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Re: Selecting Multiple Objects
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2014, 06:44:49 AM »
Great to hear the information was helpful.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline brynn

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Re: Selecting Multiple Objects
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2014, 03:57:11 PM »
Is it ok if I add a couple more techniques for selecting multiple objects?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Guest »
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Offline Aussie Carolyn

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Re: Selecting Multiple Objects
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2014, 09:04:23 AM »
You sure can. We always welcome more input on any topic.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Guest »

Offline brynn

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Re: Selecting Multiple Objects
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2014, 05:26:49 PM »
Ok, thanks.  I wasn't sure if this topic was like a tutorial, or a document, authored by you, in which case, maybe it wouldn't be appropriate for someone else to change it.  Although if the forum might be about to close, maybe it doesn't matter whether I add comments or not.  But just in case.....

So these won't have any graphics, because I don't have the kind of screenshot program that captures the mouse.  And sorry for all the text.  But don't worry, it takes about 100 times longer to explain, than it does to just do it  :P

  • Drag a selection box, or sometimes referred to as "rubberband selection".

    Using the Selection tool, on any open area on the canvas, press the mouse button and hold it down, while you drag the mouse in any diagonal direction.  You'll see a rectangular line being drawn out behind the mouse, as you drag.  (You can see that this is where "rubberband" comes from.)

    So you can position the mouse:  A - above and to the left of all the objects you want to select.  Then drag the mouse diagonally down and to the right;  B - below and to the left, then drag diagonally up and to the right; C and D likewise.  

    When you see that the rectangular line completely surrounds all the objects you want to select, just stop dragging and release the mouse.  That rectangular line will disappear, but now you'll see a bounding box surrounding all your objects (which indicates they are selected).  (The bounding box is the dashed line rectangle that goes around any selected object, no matter which tool you're using.)

    There are 2 caveats with this method:
     -- 1 is that this will select everything inside that temporary rectangular line.  So you have to be careful about it.  Let's say there are a couple of objects within the clump of those you want to select, that you don't want to select.  In that case, drag the selection box (and now everything is selected), then hold the Shift key, and click once on each object that you don't want selected.  That will deselect them, and leave all the others still selected.

     -- And the other is about selecting objects with filters (including simple blurs).  The blur or other filter effect can make the object larger than it appears to be.  So you may have to position the mouse further outside the group of objects, and drag the selection box a little wider than normal.

    Bonus info:  You can also use this technique to select nodes with the Node tool.  I don't know if it happens much, when preparing images destined for the cutting machine.  But if you have more than 1 node stacked up, either in exactly the same place, or very close to each other, and you need to select them all, you can simply drag a selection box with the Node tool, and have them all selected.

    If you need to select all the nodes of 1 object, you can also drag a selection box around all the nodes.  But I find it easier to use Ctrl A (Select All) to select all the nodes, in this case.

  • This one is probably not applicable to images destined for the cutting machine, because it's for selecting objects that lie below other objects (in z-order).  Or course, you can't have objects lying hidden behind of below other objects, because the machine will cut a hole out of the top object (at least I would assume so).  But still worth explaining, especially if you want to do realistic, or photorealistic drawings; or any kind of drawing where you have objects stacked up on top of each other.

    Let's say you have drawn a realistic ball or sphere.  You have the basic circle, which perhaps provides the base color for the ball, on the bottom, then 4 duplicates of that circle, which are mostly transparent.  2 of them are filled with a radial gradient providing shading in the bottom area of the ball, and the 2 on top are white or lighter gradients, which provide the highlighting for the ball.  But they are shaped identically, and are precisely stacked on top of each other, so there's no way to get to any of the 4 objects below the top one, except like this.

     -- click once on the top object, to select it
     -- hold the Alt key and click again, to select the 2nd one down the stack
     -- keep holding Alt key and click again, to select the 3rd one down
     -- Alt + click again, to select the 4th
     -- Alt + click again, to select the bottom object

    Now, what if you need to select the whole stack?  That's easy enough to do by dragging a selection box.  
    But what if, for some reason, you need to select the 3rd and 4 objects below, in the stack?  (Maybe you need to tweak the gradients together, to see how it affects the shading, for example.)

     -- click once on the top object
     -- Alt + click, selects the 2nd
     -- Alt + click selects the 3rd
     -- still holding the Alt key, now press and hold the Shift key (for the multiple selection like Carolyn explained above) -- so now you're holding both the Alt and Shift keys, and click once more.  The 3rd and 4th objects below the top are now selected, and none of the other ones are selected.
     
  • More bonus info:

    Some of these multiple selection techniques can be used together.  For example:

     -- Such as I explained for selecting 2 objects which are hidden below/behind other objects; use both the Alt and Shift keys, plus click to select more than 1 object (Shift) which are below/behind other objects (Alt).
     -- Also as I explained, after you have dragged a selection box around several objects, you can hold the Shift key, and click on individual objects, to deselect them.  The same as if you had selected multiple objects with Alt + drag.  Hold the Shift key and click on individual objects to deselect them.
     -- If you already have multiple objects selected, and you need to add a few more, you can either use Shift + click to add them 1 at a time; or you can hold the Shift key, and drag a selection box, to add several at a time to the selection; or hold the Shift and Alt keys, and drag through any additional objects you want to add to the selection.
     -- Note that when using Shift + click to make a multiple selection, as long as you keep the Shift key pressed, you can click a 2nd time on an object to deselect it.  However, the same does not hold for the selection box/rubberband selection, or Alt + drag.  Dragging a selection box around an object for the 2nd time, or holding Alt and dragging the mouse over an object for the 2nd time, does not deselect it.

And once again, sorry for all the text.  Everything I explained could be done in a minute or less.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Guest »
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