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Author Topic: Pai Sho tiles  (Read 2748 times)

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Offline HaaryGBD

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Pai Sho tiles
« on: February 19, 2017, 10:22:24 AM »
Hi Everyone,

I'm working on a Pai Sho gameboard, from the Last Airbender cartoons. The playing tiles need to be consistent, so I looked into milling them my machine, and the workshop I got in touch with uses Inkscape. OBVIOUSLY, I self-identify as a total noob at this. I don't even know enough Inkscape jargon to explain what I'm trying to do, so I'll just have to do it in MortalTalk:

To create 4 matching sets, I need to mill out 216 circular wooden pieces, 33mm in diameter.

Each set needs the correct number of pieces x,Y & Z and so on (which varies from piece to piece). There are 12 different designs in all. Mostly fairly simple shapes.

I want the designs to be raised on the surface of the pieces, by milling away the wood from the areas surrounding them, at a fairly shallow depth - no more than a millimetre, I'd have thought.


Now, I've managed to replicate the designs of the pieces in Inkscape, and they're all set at the right size and so forth. But how do I turn those drawings into a programme to mill out the negative spaces? And how do I differentiate the commands to etch out the designs at a shallow depth, from the commands to cut deep enough to cut out the circular piece?

I've tried reading about this, but it seems Inkscape is sort of TOO powerful, and can do TOO much. Given that I don't know what *it* calls any of those processes I just said, I don't really know where to begin. I'd be happy to load up or send the designs I've got now. I'll attach a picture of what I'm trying to replicate as well.
37a2018051fb7441142a94afd907652c.jpg
*37a2018051fb7441142a94afd907652c.jpg
(374.83 kB . 1280x956)
(viewed 1383 times)


SO what I need is,
- How do I do all that stuff up * there?
OR
- Where can I learn how to do all that stuff up * there?
ORRRRR
- Is anyone willing to take what I've got and have a whack at it themselves?

Anyone feeling helpful?

Offline brynn

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Re: Pai Sho tiles
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2017, 01:26:48 AM »
Quote
The playing tiles need to be consistent, so I looked into milling them my machine, and the workshop I got in touch with uses Inkscape.

So you won't be doing the cutting yourself, correct?  If you're going to send the drawings to the workshop, and they use Inkscape, can't they tell you what you need?

In some ways, you've found the wrong forum.  But we can still give you some clues.  This is more for the home/craft cutters - cutting paper, cardboard or maybe vinyl.  But unfortunately there isn't a forum devoted to CNC mills or other more industrial types of applications.

There is one forum...sort of....run by the team which created the extensions you probably will need (gcodetools).  The address for that forum (which is really one huge, long topic) can be found in the extensions' dialogs.  As many times as I've informed people about that forum, I don't know anyone who has actually posted there.  It may be that the translation (to/from Russian) makes it difficult, but I'm not really sure why.

All I can tell you for sure, is that you probably want to use Extensions menu > Gcodetools.  But you need to ask the workshop specifically what their machines can handle.  Rather than gcode, maybe you just need to save in a particular extension, like HPGL for example.

My best guess is that you would have a sheet of the kind of wood you want.  The first time through will make the shallow cuts - all the designs.  Then you would need to switch either to a different router bit, or maybe bandsaw? (if there is such a thing as a computer controlled bandsaw, I don't really know), to cut out the circles.  If that's correct, I think you would need all the designs in one file.  But certainly don't take my word for it.  I'm just guessing.  Maybe there's something like blanks, where you could find the round, blank kind of coins, and all you have to do is make the shallow cuts.

But if you're sending your files somewhere else to be cut, they certainly can tell you what they need or can use.

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Offline HaaryGBD

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Re: Pai Sho tiles
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2017, 08:22:30 AM »
Thanks Brynn - I knew I'd end up feeling foolish. Looks like I might be trying to overprepare then? I wanted to go as far as I could myself, before 'bothering' the guy at the workshop I guess.

Thanks again - it's really helpful to have any sort of advice, really.

Offline brynn

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Re: Pai Sho tiles
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2017, 01:17:04 AM »
Oh no, you shouldn't feel that way at all!  This is really a question we get a lot.  What's the best format to prepare my image for professional printing?  Well, it depends on the printhouse.  There are all kinds of differnet hardware and software, and each place and person has their own favorites.

So it's not uncommon at all.  Plus, I think it's good to be prepared.  Just let the people who are going to do the work be the ones to tell you how to prepare.  Once they tell you what they need, if you have any questions how to do it, please feel free to reply again, and we'll help you get there.
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